Leaving Neuroendocrine Cancer Behind

NET Survivor Finds Hope and Inspiration

That’s it—my number is up, Dave McCoy thought when he learned he had neuroendocrine cancer in 2008. A cancer, he says, that no one knew anything about. “Even the surgeons were saying, ‘I don’t know. We don’t know what to do with this thing.’ It was horrible ten years ago. There was no answer.”

In his search for answers, Dave contacted the Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation (NETRF). His contact with staff helped him learn about options and inspired him to move forward.

Watch Dave talk about his cancer journey.

A former member of the NETRF Board of Directors, Dave has witnessed dramatic progress in NET research in the last decade. “They are really finding things. The picture is getting better over time,” said Dave. “You realize what you’re doing is really going to help out the next generation. There’s hope.”

“It’s insanely hard work,” said Dave about the search for a cure. “Years and years and years just to find one piece of this 100-piece puzzle that will end up leading to the cure or better treatments.”

Dave now shares his cancer story to show what’s possible in life beyond neuroendocrine cancer and to inspire others to be part of the search for the cure.

To help improve the outlook for the neuroendocrine cancer patients of today and tomorrow, make a gift to the Spark Hope campaign. All gifts given to Spark Hope are doubled, and their impact magnified. Help create a brighter future by supporting the search for a cure.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

5
Leave a Reply

4 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
5 Comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Fred

thank you for this story. I would like to know more about Dave’s story or others like it. I was diagnosed in 2012 and my condition is stable and I am relatively hopeful but always fear the next MRI or test. I have participated in two clinical trials.

James

Dave: Your story is my story (13 years ago). Thanks for telling it.

David I

David: thanks for the inspiration

James: I’d be interested to hear more about your story. I’m just getting started with this journey and look forward to being in the same position that both of you are in years from now.

Tony

Great stuff. NETs are the silent killers but the increase in knowledge & shared experiences amongst patients in the last 12-15yrs is very encouraging. The survival rate has increased significantly too.

Robert haan

I have stage 4 Pancreatic Neuroendocrine cancer. Had surgery pancreas tail resection liver. Well differentiated intermediate grade. 3 more popped up at my first follow up. Why is there no prognosis for me. What are my chances of survival. Currently on oral chemo regimen

Leaving Neuroendocrine Cancer Behind